F.A.Q.

Questions:

Where can I download the manual and all softwarecode?

Why didn't you distribute a custom Pi image file?

What is Digital Humanities?

What is the difference between Pi-Lib and Pi-Lib-Project?

Can the Pi-Lib-Project be modified to work in museums?

How long will this website be online?

Can I use this free of charge?

Do I need coding experience to use any of this?

Can I modify the source files?

What languages did you use?

 

Where can I download the manual and all softwarecode?

Everything is stored on my OneDrive: Click to visit the folder.


Why didn't you distribute a custom Pi image file?

It would have been the easiest way of finishing this project, I wouldn't have to write all of the documentation and everyone could just write the image to an SD-card and get started with their Raspberry Pi; however, there are few reasons why I decided to invest time in clear written instructions and videos in stead of just writing the image file:

  1. There's nothing worse than handing over a system without explaining/documenting it.
  2. By going through the installation yourself, you get to know the Raspberry Pi, if something goes wrong, you can use that experience to identify and fix the problem yourself. Besides:
    • An image is always a capture of a certain system at a certain date; in other words, it gets outdated fairly quick. 
    • By doing the installation yourself, you automatically get the latest version of all relevant software 
  3. If you were to rely on my image and write that to all devices, you'd have to manually configure the WiFi, Keyboard Layout, Language etc. on all of those devices individually. If you follow the steps in the videos and/ord documentation you will only have to set one device up, and copy your own image to all other devices (It's super easy.)

What is Digital Humanities?

If you'd put 12 DH-scholars in a room, you'd probably receive 13 different answers. It's pretty hard to give a definition of Digital Humanities where everyone can agree on.


What is the difference between Pi-Lib and Pi-Lib-Project?

  1. Pi-Lib is a cross-platform sofware package that runs on Windows and Raspberry Pi's. This was an important goal for my thesis as I wanted to build a non-intrusive system that could co-exist with existing hardware. (In other words, I wanted to develop something that gave libraries the possibility to test out a few devices before replacing all traditional desktops.)
  2. Pi-Lib-Project: is the hardware project related to Pi-Lib. This project was meant to research if I could make the Pi accessible enough to get used in (public) libraries as a way to replace the traditional desktops used by visitors to search the catalogue.

Can the Pi-Lib-Project be modified to work in museums?

Yes it can, but it requires other software than Pi-Lib. If there's interest in this I'll invest time in this software after I finished the thesis.


How long will this website be online?

At least until november 2019; that's when I have to renew the hosting and domain name. If the project by then manages to finance itself I will, otherwise I will shut the website down and move all software to online repositories.


Can I use this free of charge?

Yes, from the very start this project was meant to be free; enjoy it.


Do I need coding experience to use any of this?

No you don't. You just need to follow the instructions carefully and then everything should work. However, if you plan to modify the software you will need coding experience.


Can I modify the source files?

Yes of course. Just be carefull to not mess up the syntax or structure too much.


What languages did you use?

Can't you see this is all written in English?

Now for the serious answer:

  • Pi-Lib uses Python 2.7, Bash (for Linux commands) and DOS (for Windows commands).